Supporting research pioneers, working hard to help the one in five Albertans affected by a lung or breathing conditions, is a fundamental initiative of the AB Lung. Our annual Lung Health Research Grants are a peer-reviewed competition that supports research that’s directly relevant to human respiratory health. To encourage new investigators, particular consideration is given to principal investigators who’ve received their first faculty appointment within the past five years.

Lung Health Research Grants 2023 Competition

The Lung Health Research Grants (LHRG) is a peer-reviewed competition that supports pulmonary research or development projects. Applications will be considered for research proposals that are directly relevant to human respiratory health.

A partnership between Alberta Lung and BC Lung, both organizations manage the LHRG application and peer review process. Applicants should refer to specific provincial guidelines as they may vary for each province. Competition guidelines are available here.

Applications will be considered for research proposals that are directly relevant to human respiratory health problems. Applications deemed outside the respiratory field will be eliminated from the competition. 

2023 Grant Competition Winners: 

Dr. Jason Weatherald, MD, MSc, FRCPC at the University of Alberta: Research Priorities for Lung Transplantation: A James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership
Priorities for lung transplant research according to the patients, caregivers and clinicians have not previously been defined. This project will be the first to engage patients and caregivers in this manner, working with all the lung transplant centres in Canada.

Dr. Braedon Mcdonald, MD, PhD, FRCPC at the University of Calgary: Re-defining Airway “Colonization” by Candida in Critical Illness.
Exploring how yeast microbes establish themselves in the lungs of critically ill patients, which may help minimize adverse outcomes in patient care. 

Dr. Angela Lau, MD, MSc, DTMH at the University of Alberta: Do patients with asymptomatic, subclinical pulmonary tuberculosis transmit? A population-based cohort study. Explore if people with asymptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis transmit despite having relatively few TB cells. Knowing this could help reduce transmission and lead to earlier medical intervention.

Click here to see the 2022 Competition Winners!

Questions? Contact Jamie Happy, at grantsab@ablung.ca